famous

famous, famed, renowned, celebrated, eminent, illustrious are comparable when meaning known far and wide among men.
Famous and famed apply chiefly to men, events, and things that are much talked of or are widely or popularly known throughout a section, a country, a continent, or a cultural tradition; they also imply good repute or a favorable reputation. Normally these terms are applied without qualification only to those persons or things that are still so known or that were so known in the time under consideration
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the once famous poems of Owen Meredith

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a famous American aviator

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some of our most famous physicians have had to struggle pitiably against insufficient means until they were forty or fifty— Shaw

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time has spiraled them from rebellion to eminence. They are respectably famous, and the poet Edith even fashionable— W. T. Scott

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a corpulent, jolly fellow, famed for humor— Hawthorne

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Renowned implies more glory or honor and more widespread acclamation than either famous or famed; it is, however, often employed as a stronger or more emphatic term than famous with little actual difference in meaning except for a suggestion of greater longevity of fame
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royal kings . . . renowned for their deeds . . . for Christian service and true chivalry— Shak.

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those far- renowned brides of ancient song— Tennyson

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Celebrated stresses reception of popular or public notice or attention and frequent mention, especially in print; it may also suggest public admiration or popular honor
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the celebrated kidnapping of Charley Ross

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the most celebrated of the cases pending before the Supreme Court

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Benjamin Franklin's celebrated kite

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the greatest, but the least celebrated, general in the war

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it is characteristic that in this whole "Notebook" Maugham seldom mentions any of his celebrated friends— Behrman

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Eminent implies conspicuousness for outstanding qualities; it is applicable chiefly to persons or things that are recognized as topping others of their kind
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the age produced no eminent writers

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many eminent men of science have been bad mathematicians— Russell

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eminent manifestations of this magical power of poetry are very rare and very precious— Arnold

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Illustrious carries a stronger implication of renown than eminent; it also imputes to the thing so described a glori- ousness or splendor that increases its prestige or influence
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illustrious deeds of great heroes

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his right noble mind, illustrious virtue— Shak.

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boast the pure blood of an illustrious race— Pope

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Antonyms: obscure

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Famous — Fa mous, a. [L. famosus, fr. fama fame: cf. F. fameux. See {Fame}.] Celebrated in fame or public report; renowned; mach talked of; distinguished in story; used in either a good or a bad sense, chiefly the former; often followed by for; as, famous …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Famous — steht für Almost Famous Film von Cameron Crowe Nathan’s Famous, US Restaurantkette The Famous Five, historische Frauengruppe Famous 5, Originaltitel v. Fünf Freunde für alle Fälle FAMOUS steht für: French American Mid Ocean Undersea Study,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Famous — Album par Puddle of Mudd Sortie 9 octobre 2007 Enregistrement 2007 Durée 38 min 29 s Genre Rock alternatif, post grunge …   Wikipédia en Français

  • famous — late 14c., from Anglo Fr. famous, from O.Fr. fameus (Mod.Fr. fameux), from L. famosus much talked of, renowned, often infamous, notorious, of ill repute, from fama (see FAME (Cf. fame)). A native word for this was O.E. namcuð, lit. name known.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • famous — [fā′məs] adj. [ME < L famosus < fama: see FAME] 1. much talked about; having fame, or celebrity; renowned 2. Informal excellent; very good; first rate 3. Archaic notorious SYN. FAMOUS is applied to persons or things that have received wide… …   English World dictionary

  • famous — I adjective acclaimed, applauded, celeber, celebrated, celebrated in public, conspicuous, distinguished, elevated, eminent, esteemed, exalted, fabled, famed, foremost, glorified, glorious, held in high esteem, highly reputed, holding public… …   Law dictionary

  • famous — [adj] legendary, notable to many acclaimed, applauded, august, brilliant, celebrated, conspicuous, distinguished, elevated, eminent, exalted, excellent, extraordinary, foremost, glorious, grand, great, honored, illustrious, important, imposing,… …   New thesaurus

  • famous — ► ADJECTIVE 1) known about by many people. 2) informal magnificent. DERIVATIVES famously adverb famousness noun. ORIGIN Latin famosus, from fama fame …   English terms dictionary

  • famous — fa|mous W2S2 [ˈfeıməs] adj [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: fameus, from Latin fama; FAME] 1.) a) known about by many people in many places ▪ a famous actor ▪ Many famous people have stayed in the hotel. ▪ The Eiffel Tower is a famou …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • famous — adjective 1 known about and talked about by many people in many places: a famous actor (+ for): France is famous for its wine. (+ as): Virginia is famous as the birthplace of several US presidents. | world famous (=famous all over the world): Da… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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